Bien Cuit

Accolades

Ina Garten visits Bien Cuit for her show The Barefoot Contessa

January 2014

USA today votes Bien Cuit one of the 21 Best Bakeries in the United States

December 7, 2013

Bien Cuit is featured on Cooking Channel’s Unique Sweets

January 2013

The Village Voice has named our pastries as New York’s best for 2012!

October 21, 2012

NBC’s Food and Travel Blog, Itineraries, lists Bien Cuit as one of America’s Best Bakeries!

August 21, 2012

Food and Wine Magazine lists Bien Cuit as one of the top Bakery Spots in NYC

August 20, 2012

Time Out NY lists Bien Cuit’s Chocolate Chip cookie as one of the Best in New York City!

August 17, 2012

Saveur praises Bien Cuit for being among the 20 Great American Bread Bakeries

May 22, 2012

Bon Appétit lists Bien Cuit’s baguette as one of the “10 Best in America” (Bien Cuit’s baguettes featured as the cover photo!)

May 5, 2012

The New York Times includes Bien Cuit among “Ten of the Best Inexpensive Restaurants of 2011

December 28, 2011

Praise

“Mr. Golper, who oversees the ovens at Bien Cuit, a bakery in Brooklyn, is part of a starter culture of obsessive, boundary-pushing bread makers in New York City and around the country. Connoisseurs consider his miche, a French-style country loaf, something of a crown jewel. “

THE NEW YORK TIMES, APRIL 23, 2014

“We know Bien Cuit from its Smith Street store, where the ovens in back fill the space with a warm and toasty aroma—and great loaves. But owners Zachary Golper and Kate Wheatcroft also have a big baking facility down in the Sunset Park industrial zone. There, they’re crafting great baked goods for coffee shops, sandwich stores, and some of the city’s best high-end restaurants.”

SERIOUS EATS, JANUARY 2014

Remarkably, Golper’s talent spans what are traditionally considered two separate arts–those of baking and pastry. In France, there are dedicated boulangeries (bakeries) and patisseries (pastry shops), and those who form the dough in each take pride in mastering their respective crafts. But it’s rare to find someone who’s equally gifted in both departments.

BON APPETIT, JANUARY 2013

Warning: To avoid eating Bien Cuit’s spectacular bread before you reach home, you may need to take deep huffs from the bag. Strange looks from subway commuters could ensue. They can stare all they want because you’re the one cradling the five boroughs’ best bread.

TASTING TABLE, JANUARY 2013

If you’re a Brooklyn resident, you’ve probably heard of the café before, most likely linked with words like “the bread,” “pastries,” “like Paris,” and “addiction.” With its first location in Manhattan, the owners seek to maintain the same vibe as Bien’s BK counterpart. However, when placed in the West Village, the café-bakery takes on a whole different feel, more European, as if a page from a Brontë book was brought to life.

BLACKBOOK MAGAZINE, JANUARY 2013

Pete Wells, New York Times Restaurant Critic, and Mitchell Davis, Vice President of The James Beard Foundation, discuss their love of Bien Cuit.

Mitchell Davis, “Taste Matters” Episode 52, September 2012

“Can’t make it to Paris this month? Not to worry. We love the baguettes from Bien Cuit.”

Bon Appétit, May 2012

“Zachary Golper worked at Philadelphia’s famed high-end French restaurant Le Bec-Fin before opening this phenomenal Brooklyn bakery with an open kitchen and marble counters. Bien Cuit means “well done,” and Golper’s breads and pastries are certainly that: the sourdough baguettes are chewy, airy and lightly tangy; the giant miche has a thick, dark brown crust; the croissants are shatteringly crisp; and the elegant pastries are fastidiously made.”

Food and Wine, October 2012

“The husband-wife team behind Bien Cuit serves bread as good, if not better than, some bakeries in France.”

NEW YORK MAGAZINE, February 2012

“The baker, Zachary Golper, delivers on the promise of “bien cuit” with a baguette that’s crisp, but with a crumb that’s still chewy.  Pastries are ethereal.  Croissants shatter, as croissants should, showering the plate with sizable shards to be eaten with the last of your coffee.”

The New York Times, December 28, 2011